from “Daughter of a Tree Farm”

SAM_5234

“When children can no longer devote sympathy, owing to growing up. One mind always engaged or found with labor in order to be. Later on the trees acquired winter. Sent and took and did not go out. The weight of never shedding. We anticipated a cure if come willingly. We were unable to carry out nature. These impressions, fresh, often made me to see his life previous, the principal sadness I had to recognize.

We planted trees. We cleared the pond. Gathered different, undisturbed faith. Gradually the steps further and further withdrawing over the hills, beyond the fencerow. I was too weak. I was often driven, but saw no way. I would never go back.

The difference, between us, not because I remained the same, unable to unalter, but taken from the midst, rarely clouded, and the broken. It was this, which woke me open, opened to an outsider, a stranger.”

The Academy of American Poets published this section of Daughter of a Tree Farm by Carrie Olivia Adams. I know not what to say in response to it, nor do I understand it. But it has intrigued me and been on my mind for the past few days.

I was too weak. I was often driven, but saw no way. I would never go back. 

 

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